Talking testing, agility and automation... and anything else.



14
Mar 15

Inspirado: Steve Jobs

I would join Apple Computer about two years after this clip, and there was still grumbling about OpenDoc‘s demise; one of the many technologies that geeks dug, that Jobs killed. Obviously history has been kind to his decisions, but at the time, these decisions took serious balls. Jobs was many things… but lacking cojones? I seriously doubt anyone ever accused him of that.


09
Jul 14

How To Do Something In An Agile Fashion

03-cat-jumping-lgnDave Thomas (PragDave) has an interesting post regarding the use of the word “Agile”. In it, he argues against the use of “agile” as a noun, preferring using “agility”… fair enough… but like the context driven folks, who would have us use the phrase “automated checks” instead of “automated tests”, I don’t really care. The argument itself may be interesting, but semantic change is a bitch; good luck!

But he also talks about “How to do something in an agile fashion”… which I found most intriguing:

What to do:
• Find out where you are
• Take a small step towards your goal
• Adjust your understanding based on what you learned
• Repeat

How to do it:
When faced with two of more alternatives that deliver roughly the same value, take the path that makes future change easier.

I love the simplicity of this. Additionally, he also states:
“…anyone who comes up with something bigger or more complex is just trying to sell you something.”

Nice work, sir… and for that, I changed my tagline to aid your cause :)


17
Feb 13

Headed To GTAC New York

I’m looking forward to attending this year’s Google Test Automation Conference (GTAC) in New York!


06
Dec 12

Should You Just Stop Tracking Bugs?

With apologies to Ian Betteridge for the hyperbolic headline, I wanted to share this 6 minute lightning talk in which Jon Tørresdal argues for “The simplest solution to bug tracking: don’t!”.

To paraphrase Jon’s list of 5 “crazy ideas”:

  1. Don’t track bugs; just fix them
  2. Delete all bugs in your backlog that you can’t fix immediately
  3. All newly reported bugs are either rejected or fixed immediately
  4. Automated tests are created for each new bug
  5. Set WIP limit for bugs (eg. 20 total)

Ten years ago I would have scoffed at the idea of not tracking bugs and deleting the bug backlog, but today, I can see this as a realistic possibility. In fact, this isn’t far from how my current team operates today. So what’s stopping me from going all in? Guts?


11
Mar 12

Bret Victor – Inventing on Principle

I found this video via Slashdot and after watching it, read some of the comments… which hilariously missed the scope of the presentation. I post it here because it reminds me… that if you abolish boxes, there’s no need to think outside of them.