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Fail Faster

The primary goal of automated tests is to find failures as quickly as possible. The general idea being that bugs found earlier in development are cheaper to fix. This is generally true, but automation isn’t the only way to fail fast. Here are a few tips for failing faster that have worked well for me, and may work for you too!

Get QA involved in planning

During planning, QA should be building a mental (or even physical) test plan. This is the perfect time to start asking questions about how to test this new feature. Perhaps you’ll need a special resource, like a third-party tool that you’ll use to aid testing, or maybe your tests need to run on an isolated server. Identifying these needs during planning can give you the time you’ll need to acquire them, and get them in place for testing.

This is also a great time to aid testing by baking things right into the app. For example, having a parameter flag in an URL, or an a/b switch, can make a feature much more test-friendly, and impact the speed of your testing effort.

Code review

The importance of meaningful code review cannot be overstated. Whether you’re pair programming or reviewing code before it’s merged, this is a great time to not just find bugs, but to prevent future bugs by gaining a shared understanding of the code, removing complexity and ambiguity, and ensuring code standards are being followed.

Write e2e tests while code is in active development

The best time to write e2e tests is while the dev is actively developing the feature itself. This can be done in a TDD fashion, whereby you create your tests and page objects, have them fail, and get them to pass as the feature is completed. This is also the perfect time to quickly find CSS bugs, and/or add CSS tags to make automating easier. I mean, who doesn’t love a solid ID to grab onto?

Additionally, writing and committing e2e tests directly in the app feature branch can help keep the app code and test code organized until they are both merged… together! It’s also great to have the dev writing the feature, review the e2e tests. Who better to review the tests than the dev that wrote the code! This has the added benefit of keeping devs acquainted with the e2e code.

Handoffs/desk checks

These short meetings are held after the app code is reviewed, but just before moving a story to QA. In this meeting, a dev visually runs through the feature for QA, showing off the feature and answering questions. The primary goal for this meeting is to ensure a shared understanding of the feature, including any changes since it was planned, and any testing tips the dev derived during coding. It’s also a great time to make sure your automated tests (unit/integration/e2e) are up to snuff.

Sluff off on this process at your peril; you WILL regularly find bugs during it. I promise.

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